SEARCH: Not So Dumb Supper

Not So Dumb Supper

by Emerian Rich

When people hear the term Dumb Supper they laugh, but it’s been a part
of my family fall tradition for many years. The term Dumb Supper doesn’t refer to a stupid meal, but rather an evening meal in which you honor those who have passed on.

In some cultures, it’s used to the call spirits of the dead to eat with you, but since my family has members of different faiths—those who believe in spirits and those who think it’s a load of malarkey—we use it as a way to remember those who have died in our family.

Elitists would say there is a certain way to hold a Dumb Supper. Some believe it must be conducted entirely in silence, involve a detailed ceremony, or the table must be set with only black decor… Continue reading in SEARCH Magazine’s Fall 2020 issue.

SEARCH: Seven Fishes into the 21st Century

Seven Fishes into the 21st Century

by Kristin Battestella

Holiday Italian Feast of 7 Fishes with Snapper Octopus and Pasta

From Grandma’s smelts and baccala (dried and salted cod), to earlier Italian immigrants buying seafood at the bait shop, many Italian American millennials have heard horror stories of Feasts of the Seven Fishes.

This annual Christmas Eve tradition, born out of old Catholic rules regarding not eating meat on holy days, can seem like a chore for today’s busy holiday season. Who has the time to cook seven different types of fish in one night? Many on-the-go families don’t sit down for such multi-course dining on Christmas Eve. Also, between kids who may not like fish, seafood allergies, vegetarian specialties, and dietary restrictions, why prepare what your holly jolly guests may not even eat? With increasingly casual December celebrations and a packed holiday calendar, there’s little time or twenty-first century inclination to honor old world traditions like the Feast of the Seven Fishes.

Or is there?

Marrying a non-Italian meant if I wanted to introduce my family traditions into my own household, liberties on the Feast of the Seven Fishes had to be taken. How can Italian homemakers and Italian food lovers alike incorporate these holiday foods for contemporary, fast-paced, picky eaters? Here are a few new ways… Continue reading in SEARCH Magazine’s Fall 2020 issue.

SEARCH: Punjabi Weddings

Punjabi Weddings

Engagement is a significant part of a Punjabi wedding. First, the girl is draped with a chunni (very decorative dupatta ), which is usually very ornate. In some families this chunni is a family heirloom, passed down from generation to generation. She is also presented with jewelry, which her mother and sister-in-law help her wear. A tiny dot of henna paste (mehndi) is applied to her palm…

Continue reading in SEARCH Magazine’s Fall 2020 issue.

SEARCH: A Child of Two World

A Child of Two Worlds

by Camellia Rains

Growing up as a kid from two different cultures doesn’t sound like that big of a deal now; and maybe it’s because it isn’t. With the advent of the internet and cell phones that have become our own personal mini-computers, the world is at our fingertips–literally.

Forty years ago, things were quite a bit different. Other cultures were things to be studied at libraries, not something to be seen every day.

It wasn’t until I entered kindergarten that I began to realize my mom and dad weren’t like the other kids’ parents. My father is a natural citizen of the United States, hailing from Arkansas, the second youngest of ten children.

He is Caucasian with an English, Irish, and Welsh ancestry. My mother is a first generation immigrant from Guatemala. She has been a citizen of the US for most of my life. My folks met and married, and then, I came long. I look nothing like my petite mother with her dark skin, dark hair, and dark eyes. With my pale skin and green eyes, I look like my father.

My mother had family in Guatemala that would send her packages with things like dried chili, big bars of raw chocolate, coin purses, and clothing for me… Continue reading in SEARCH Magazine’s Fall 2020 issue.

SEARCH: The Time for Women’s Hockey is Now

As part of our Blast from the Past issue, we’re revisiting useful articles from past issues. This article first appeared in our Spring 2020 issue:

The Time for Women’s Hockey is Now

by Kristin Battestella

Battestella_hockey_SearchMagazineSeveral years ago, I entered the ice rink and saw a small boy struggling with the door to the ice. Any rink rat knows those ice doors are hefty with mechanisms difficult to close. I told him I had it, shutting the door as some guy in the stands shouted, “What are you a wuss? A girl had to close the door for you?”

I haven’t been a girl since the mid-nineties when I first played ice hockey in the local boys’ league. Similar hecklers would shout then that I shouldn’t be there because girls can’t play hockey. The irony is women have been playing ice hockey as long as men. The National Women’s Hockey League’s Isobel Cup is named after Lord Stanley’s daughter, and photos of Isobel on the ice in her Victorian bustle endure alongside dozens more pictures of Gibson Girls skating for teams such as the Vancouver Amazons and the Seattle Vamps.

Women’s ice hockey first drew international attention when debuting at the 1998 Nagano Olympic games. Goaltender Manon Rheaume had played in pre-season games for the National Hockey League’s expansion Tampa Bay Lightning several years prior, but many viewed her time in net as a publicity stunt. However, the U.S. National Team beating Canada to win gold inspired thousands of girls to take up the sport. USA Hockey experienced exponential… Continue reading in SEARCH Magazine’s Summer 2020 issue.

SEARCH: The Time for Women’s Hockey is Now

The Time for Women’s Hockey is Now

by Kristin Battestella

Battestella_hockey_SearchMagazineSeveral years ago, I entered the ice rink and saw a small boy struggling with the door to the ice. Any rink rat knows those ice doors are hefty with mechanisms difficult to close. I told him I had it, shutting the door as some guy in the stands shouted, “What are you a wuss? A girl had to close the door for you?”

I haven’t been a girl since the mid-nineties when I first played ice hockey in the local boys’ league. Similar hecklers would shout then that I shouldn’t be there because girls can’t play hockey. The irony is women have been playing ice hockey as long as men. The National Women’s Hockey League’s Isobel Cup is named after Lord Stanley’s daughter, and photos of Isobel on the ice in her Victorian bustle endure alongside dozens more pictures of Gibson Girls skating for teams such as the Vancouver Amazons and the Seattle Vamps.

Women’s ice hockey first drew international attention when debuting at the 1998 Nagano Olympic games. Goaltender Manon Rheaume had played in pre-season games for the National Hockey League’s expansion Tampa Bay Lightning several years prior, but many viewed her time in net as a publicity stunt. However, the U.S. National Team beating Canada to win gold inspired thousands of girls to take up the sport. USA Hockey experienced exponential… Continue reading in SEARCH Magazine’s Spring 2020 issue.

SEARCH: The Importance of Space Research

The Importance of Space Research
by A.R. Neal

spacenealAsk anyone why exploring and researching space is important, and the number of answers would likely exceed the number of people in this galaxy. Two major entities tasked with space research offer views as to why such exploration is important.

The European Space Agency (ESA) scientists suggest that one of the best ways to understand things that make the planet function is to examine comets, asteroids, moons, other planets, and space events like solar storms. ESA’s projects include investing in the science of space research, which provides economic stimulus in the form of jobs and industries that relate to the technologies–like spacecraft, telescopes, microscopes, and computers–that make it all work. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) leaders have identified similar goals, such as… continue reading in the Fall 2019 issue.

SEARCH: Ghosts Around the World

Ghosts Around the World
by Dianna Kersey

ghosts

If you believe in ghosts, you’re not alone in this world. Over 39% of Brits and 45% of Americans believe in ghosts.

In researching for my book, Exsanguinate, I learned the world over has an obsession with the paranormal, especially ghosts. While many ghost stories are similar in nature, each culture has a different spin on them.

Many ghost stories are believed to stem from parents’ efforts to teach the rights and wrongs of life to children. Take for instance the tale called The Liver. A family gave money to a son to go to the store to purchase liver for dinner. The boy purchased candy instead and stole a liver from a drunk man. Later that night and for weeks to come, the boy was haunted by a voice constantly saying, “Give me back my liver, you thief!” If that won’t curtail a child’s bad habits, I don’t know what will … continue reading in the Fall 2018 issue of SEARCH.

SEARCH: Rosicrucian Museum

Rosicrucian Museum

by Emerian Rich

egyptian museumEgyptian mythology is something I’ve been interested in for a long time. Ever since I tried to write my name in hieroglyphics for history class the pull of the exotic and unknown has infected me. The fashion, the makeup, the clothes—one needs only watch The Mummy or read about Cleopatra to be interested in their society.

The Rosicrucian Egyptian Museum in San Jose, California is a fabulous place to explore Egyptian beliefs, customs, and daily life. Built in 1928, the location was the site of The Rosicrucian Order and holds the largest collection of Egyptian antiquities in the Western United States. The artifacts have grown and outbuildings continue to multiply.

The massive lot the museum sits on not only holds the museum, expansive gardens, and planetarium, but the Rose-Croix University and the Rosicrucian Research Library. Peace Garden is a reproduction of an 18th Dynasty Estate Garden where you can experience many plants that grew in ancient Egypt and sit for a quiet moment of meditation. Rosicrucian Park holds statues, monuments, and even a giant obelisk to admire. The gardens are relaxing and seem to transport you into a different, calmer time.

In 2018, the museum became a net-zero energy building, meaning the total amount of energy used by the building on an annual basis … continue reading in the Fall 2018 issue of SEARCH.