SEARCH: Chasing the Horizon

Chasing the Horizon by Lillian Csernica

In this new world where many families are sheltering in place, parents must find creative solutions when it comes to keeping our kids happy, healthy, and moving forward. A predictable, consistent home life with a regular routine is a key element of good mental health. This provides a safe space for the exploration of something new.

From Why is Routine so Important to People with ASD? “Though it might seem counterintuitive, reinforcing routines can actually help those with ASD to stop relying on them so much as a crutch. Routine can be powerful in reinforcing a feeling of well-being and stability for autistic individuals. When that sense of stability and wellness is fulfilled, then it can actually be easier for them to handle other changes.”

Read more in SEARCH Magazine‘s Enhancing Your Horizon issue.

SEARCH: Autism, Food For Thought

Autism, Food For Thought by Lillian Csernica.

Why people give advice:
They need emotional validation, which means helping someone feel heard and understood. On the positive end of this spectrum we find the people who really do just want to help. They feel anxious when they see our kids struggling. On the negative end dwell people determined to control everyone and everything around them. Susan Saint-Welch, LMFT, explains why these people need so much control. “Sometimes they just wear ‘good people’ down. They are not bad people usually. They have learned or believe that the only way to get what they want is to ‘corner’ someone and pressure them to do what they want. Sometimes they will adopt another tactic and become emotionally upset, there-by making you feel guilty and responsible for their upset feelings. However, no one is ever ‘responsible’ for how someone else feels. How we feel is our own response.” To read more, click on the Winter Issue here.

SEARCH: Cooking with the Kids

Cooking with the Kids by Kay Tracy.

My stepchildren and I started cooking together when they were 3 and 5. Early lessons included cutting hot dogs with a safe butter knife, making Pylsur Pasta, stirring sauces, and baking cookies.

Along the way, they learned to stir without a splash and how to crack eggs without adding shells.

There are many reasons to cook with your children. Most importantly, it allows you to bond in time spent together and provides them a sense of accomplishment from making something and being able to eat it. It’s an opportunity to teach hygiene, like washing hands properly and cleaning up after-ward. You can also sneak in math when they measure, double, or halve a recipe.

They’ll learn even if they don’t know it. Drop-ping pasta into the boiling water from too high is not a good idea but wearing an apron and long sleeves is. Tool use, from cutting fruit or vegetables to frosting a cake, helps with hand-eye coordination. Decorating cookies at Christmas is a fun way to engage the children, even if they lick frosting off their fingers….

To read more, click on the Winter Issue here.

SEARCH: The Lighter Side: Name That Therapy

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The Lighter Side: Name That Therapy

by Tim Reynolds

My family has been around for a long time, as I’m sure yours has. For too many generations to count, the Reynolds Family Tree has been full of greats and not-so-greats, but I think the time has finally come for us to get some serious, professional therapy.

Our arboreal graphic includes sailing over on The Mayflower, acquiring the rights to Martha’s Vineyard and Nantucket for 40 pounds and two beaver skin hats, the longest missionary effort in Christendom, involvement in the American Revolution, being chased out of the US after said revolution, bringing Canada together as a nation, and being present at the Russian Revolution. Fidel Castro even tried to recruit my Navy pilot father to help him take back his homeland from some dictator name Batista, but that’s a story for another time.

I used to think that the shadiest part of my family history was being chased out of Salem, Massachusetts way back when, but then I happened to look a wee bit closer at the more recent sections of this glorious Tree of Me. My concern really took root when I looked at my own parents…read more in the Fall issue of SEARCH Magazine.

SEARCH: He is Brave, Autism Awareness

In the Summer Issue of SEARCH Magazine,
we explore autism awareness with Ashley Vrublevsky.
brave

He’s running. I’m chasing. The ocean is in view, and there is no stopping him. A few glances back reveal his enormous grin, his pure joy. High pitched squeals of delight escape his lungs. I have to keep a close distance, or we will both be taking a swim in the icy Pacific. There’s no fear in his eyes. No worry. No doubt. He sees what he wants, and he’s determined.

He is brave.

Every day since his birth I have questioned myself in one way or another. Since his diagnosis, I’ve been even harder on myself. Paralyzing doubt is not something I had ever had to experience. I was young and in love, graduating from one of the top business schools in the country, and had a year under my belt at a cushy government job. No complaints, right? Then my world opened up to the beautiful mess of motherhood. I learned what it really meant to love and live for the health and well-being of a tiny little person. This tiny little person has forever changed who I am and who I will become…” to read the full article, check out the free eCopy here.

SEARCH: GEOCACHING, Get lost and find hidden treasures

In the Summer Issue of SEARCH Magazine,
GEOCACHING: Get lost and find hidden treasures
By Dianna Kersey

“Do you long for days when you can escape the hustle and grind, wishing to get lost in the wilderness? Does the thought of getting off course in the woods keep you from embracing your inner adventurer? Ditch those fears, slip on your hiking boots, and break out that old forgotten compass. We can help you squelch those worries. Go outside and play, again! We’ve got the apps to help you plan, experience, and celebrate the pirate within.

The best night of the week is family game night, and our family looks forward to searching online for local nature trails and geocaches we can tackle. We decide where we want to explore and then plan a Sunday afternoon picnic of it.

Sometimes, a quick trek to the grocery store makes for the best cache finds! For instance, we stopped for milk and bread, and our daughter scored a challenging cache attached to the rebar post inside of the cement parking barrier. Check out that smile…” to read the full article, check out the free eCopy here.

5 Holiday Tips For Parents with Autistic Kids

5 Holiday Tips For Parents with Autistic Kids

by Ashley Vrublevskiy

photo“When my son Zander was just over a month old, we took a family trip to the beach in Oregon. I dipped his tiny toes in the sand for the first time as we breathed in the crisp, salty ocean air. The ocean called, and he was hooked, as was his momma. That’s when I started to daydream about future trips to the ocean with him. What beautiful, ethereal images danced in my head.

Zander was three when we got his diagnosis. Autism Spectrum Disorder, non-verbal, speech delay, sensory processing disorder. It all hit me like a truck, as it would any parent. I could have left it at that, labeled, but he is so much more than any label could ever describe…” to read the full article, download the free eCopy of SEARCH Magazine‘s Winter Issue.