SEARCH: Half Moon Bay

Half Moon Bay
By Michele Roger

HALF MOON BAYMany travelers book accommodations listed as San Francisco while, in actuality, the hotels are located up to thirty or forty-five minutes outside of the city. Host to over one hundred unique conferences, San Francisco chains host 16.9 million tourists each year.

We all love conferences thanks to networking, motivational lectures, and the general buzz we all get from gathering in one place with like-minded people. They give me the sense that I may be crazy, but I’m not alone.

itting with friends, I had not seen in over a year and drinking coffee was great. Let’s face it, I don’t want to spend my entire weekend eating hotel dining room food. That’s the beauty of Half Moon Bay. With a fifteen minute drive from my hotel, my friends and I were able to escape the scheduled events for a short time, enjoy lunch, … continue reading in the Summer issue for 2018.

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SEARCH: Recycling Glass Jars

Recycling Glass Jars
by Larriane Barnard

bottlesIf I spent the time, I suppose I could find online, somewhere, useless information on how far the glass jars in the landfills would reach if laid end to end.

I’ve got a pretty good idea glass jars would beat the plastic water bottles shown on some commercials.

Even though many companies are switching to plastic jars, you can give yourself a good idea how many are thrown away by the number of glass ones you pitch in the garbage a week. I know how quickly my jar cabinet filled to overflowing once I started saving them to use instead of plastic containers that melt or stain in the micro or throw away foil, plastic bags, and plastic wrap. I’ve had to shift my going green efforts to include carting my overflow off to the thrift store for repurposing.

Why go to the trouble you ask? A metal lid with a gasket insert makes the jar bug and rodent proof, air and water tight to store liquid, mushy, powdered, or solids. Without a gasket, they’re still … continue reading the Summer issue of SEARCH Magazine.

SEARCH: Just Keep Swimming

Just Keep Swimming
by Lillian Csernica

AUTISMTo many people, summer means the beach with hot sand, cool water, sunshine, cold drinks, carnival rides, and all that glorious junk food. I remember the day my husband and I took our son, John, to the beach for the first time. John wasn’t even in kindergarten yet, but he already showed a fondness for water.

In early spring, the weather was still cold, the water even colder. John stood there holding his father’s hand, staring out at the Pacific Ocean with his eyes wide. The sight of it blew his mind.

Later, once the weather warmed up, we took John to the beach for the usual fun. That’s when we discovered the sensation of cold means … continue reading the Summer 2018 issue of SEARCH Magazine.

SEARCH: Ambiguous Loss

Ambiguous Loss
by Emerian Rich

AMBIGIOUSLOSSAUTIS,

When you have a baby, your whole world changes. Everyone tells you this will happen when you’re pregnant and it’s one of life’s solid truths along with death and taxes. Still, no matter how you prepare for it, or think you’re ready, it always seems to catch you off guard.

My son was born happy and healthy, if a bit early, twelve years ago. Despite complications during and after pregnancy, we were pretty happy for about a year. We reveled in the new baby smell. We giggled at his baby bandito burrito shape. We even smiled when he pooed. Every parent on the planet can recount these cute stories, whether you want them to or not.

At about a year old we realized we needed to get our son checked out. Even though he was a happy, energy-filled cutie, with the exception of…continue reading the Spring 2018 issue of SEARCH Magazine.

SEARCH: Berkeley, California

Berkeley, California
By Sumiko Saulson

CITY SPOTLIGHT BERKELEYBerkeley is a progressive college town, well known for its commitment to arts, culture, and the ecology. It’s the first US city to create accessible spaces and curbside cutouts for the mobility impaired back in the seventies.

Farmer’s markets, pro-cyclist events like Sunday Streets Berkeley, plentiful bicycle lanes, and automobile-free zones, community gardens, composting, recycling centers, urban farming, and parks dedicated to preserving native wildlife are part of how Berkeley works towards a greener planet.

University of California Berkeley is home to a beautifully manicured thirty-four acre botanical garden featuring foot bridges, relaxing streams, lush flora, and aromatic flowers from around the globe. It’s Student Organic Garden at the corner of Walnut and Virginia Streets, encourages urban farmers to grow healthy, earth-friendly fresh foods…continue reading in the Spring 2018 issue.

Spring 2018, Editor Letter

I was not always a gardener. I’d lived in dorms, apartments, and rented a house without ever noticing the plants around me. Once I owned my own house, I became excited at the possibilities for the sad, weed-riddled plots circling my yard. I wanted my kids outdoors, riding bicycles and playing tag. A neighbor kindly took me under her wing, perhaps inspired by the view of my yard through her front window, and opened my eyes to the many annuals, perennials, herbs, and evergreens. I found every plant interesting and soon brought home dozens of plants with every kind of foliage and flower.

Since then, my landscaping has calmed down. I’ve learned to arrange the same plants in groupings so they’re more noticeable and easier to maintain, and to appreciate the strength of a good shrub instead of spending money on perennials that flower for a week and do nothing the rest of the year. My gardening fever has calmed, but the joy of seeing new life never ends.

This spring, we welcome you to enter the garden with us. Whether you have a green thumb or prefer to admire plant life from the path, we’ve got you covered. In this issue, you’ll find tips on making things with the herbs you grow and on attracting birds to your garden. Celebrate the refreshing beauty of our local Ruth Bancroft Garden and Philadelphia’s Bartram’s Garden. Get your copy today!

Heather Roulo
Operations Director

 

 

 

SEARCH: SCRAP, San Francisco

SCRAP, San Francisco
By Emerian Rich

SCRAPSFSCRAP is an awesome place for crafters, teachers, and makers. Essentially an art and crafts thrift store, this nonprofit is a great place to both donate and shop.

Calling themselves “a source for the resourceful”, SCRAP is a creative re-use center, material depot, and workshop space founded in 1973. Breathing new life into old objects, SCRAP reduces waste by diverting over 200 tons of materials heading to landfill every year. For those looking for a learning opportunity, SCRAP offers classes and workshops. Some are regular drop-in events, while others require registration beforehand.

Located at 801 Toland Street, San Francisco, this is a creators dream. Supplies are inexpensive and range from fabric and home decorating items to paper, craft supplies, crayons, and books. Educators will love…continue reading in the Winter issue for 2017.

SEARCH: Rodeo, California

Rodeo, California
By Leslie Light

RodeoRodeo, California was not my first choice to live in. It’s a small town on the north-western edge of the San Francisco Bay Area. It isn’t tony, or upscale, or even hipster. What it is, however, is easy. Easy to get to and out of. Easy to stay in and make a quiet home. We’ve been here five years and will probably stay five more.

Rodeo is bisected by the I-80 freeway. The built up part of town can be divided into three areas: Old, Mid-Century, and New. Most of the Rodeo town limits is open space where cows graze, and there is rumored to be an old military installation somewhere. Regardless of where you are, you can see a field of grass.

In the “old” part of town are cute three and four bedroom houses built before WWII. Sitting porches with views of rose bushes are the primary look and feel. Many have back decks have a view of San Pablo Bay. Most of the Mid-Century houses were built for…continue reading in the Winter issue for 2017.

SEARCH: Galindo House, Concord

Galindo House, Concord
By Emerian Rich

Galindo.jpgMost Concord residents never knew the Galindo house existed until a few years ago when the Concord Historical Society took charge of the estate and cleaned up the trees and greenery in front of it.

Located at 1721 Amador Avenue, Galindo House was built in 1856 for one of Concord’s founders, Don Francisco Galindo and his wife Maria Dolores Manuella Pacheco. The six-room farmhouse sat on the then seventeen-thousand acres of land granted to Galindo after the Mesoamerican War. The names Galindo and Pacheco will sound familiar to residents because many of our streets and buildings are named after the founding fathers. Don Salvio Pacheo’s Adobe at 1870 Abode Street—belonging to Maria’s father—is another notable building still standing from that time period, but Galindo House was the first wooden house built in town. …continue reading in the Winter issue for 2017.

Winter 2017, Editor Letter

The word cozy conjures up images of comforters and warm socks by the fire with a good book. Cozy can mean cuddling up with your favorite person and a movie. Cozy means comfortable, safe, and comfy.

A cozy memory for me is when I was a child sitting by my grandmother as she crocheted a new lap rug, with one of her very own creations covering our laps as we watched TV. Gram was a woman who couldn’t sit still and do nothing. She had an antsy “do-er” bug that inspired her to make dolls, tissue boxes, afghans, you name it. If it required yarn and a needle or hook, it was destined to become her project, but she didn’t just make these things for herself and her family. Every year, she crocheted a thousand afghans to give away at nursing homes. Her gift of crocheting spread coziness throughout the care facilities of Colorado Springs. It’s a gene she passed on to me. I’ve decided I will continue her tradition of selflessness this year by donating some of my crocheted items to those who need a piece of cozy to get through the winter. It might not be a thousand pieces like Gram, but hopefully it will bring cozy to a few people who really need it.

What are your favorite cozy activities? This issue of SEARCH will help you stay inside and keep cozy as we explore cozy books, music, and food. For you who like going out in the cold, we’ll add in some fun adventures away from home, like touring the Galindo house in Concord or shopping at SCRAP. Read more about cozy in our Winter 2017 Issue.

Emerian Rich
Editorial Director