SEARCH: Galindo House, Concord

Galindo House, Concord
By Emerian Rich

Galindo.jpgMost Concord residents never knew the Galindo house existed until a few years ago when the Concord Historical Society took charge of the estate and cleaned up the trees and greenery in front of it.

Located at 1721 Amador Avenue, Galindo House was built in 1856 for one of Concord’s founders, Don Francisco Galindo and his wife Maria Dolores Manuella Pacheco. The six-room farmhouse sat on the then seventeen-thousand acres of land granted to Galindo after the Mesoamerican War. The names Galindo and Pacheco will sound familiar to residents because many of our streets and buildings are named after the founding fathers. Don Salvio Pacheo’s Adobe at 1870 Abode Street—belonging to Maria’s father—is another notable building still standing from that time period, but Galindo House was the first wooden house built in town. …continue reading in the Winter issue for 2017.

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Winter 2017, Editor Letter

The word cozy conjures up images of comforters and warm socks by the fire with a good book. Cozy can mean cuddling up with your favorite person and a movie. Cozy means comfortable, safe, and comfy.

A cozy memory for me is when I was a child sitting by my grandmother as she crocheted a new lap rug, with one of her very own creations covering our laps as we watched TV. Gram was a woman who couldn’t sit still and do nothing. She had an antsy “do-er” bug that inspired her to make dolls, tissue boxes, afghans, you name it. If it required yarn and a needle or hook, it was destined to become her project, but she didn’t just make these things for herself and her family. Every year, she crocheted a thousand afghans to give away at nursing homes. Her gift of crocheting spread coziness throughout the care facilities of Colorado Springs. It’s a gene she passed on to me. I’ve decided I will continue her tradition of selflessness this year by donating some of my crocheted items to those who need a piece of cozy to get through the winter. It might not be a thousand pieces like Gram, but hopefully it will bring cozy to a few people who really need it.

What are your favorite cozy activities? This issue of SEARCH will help you stay inside and keep cozy as we explore cozy books, music, and food. For you who like going out in the cold, we’ll add in some fun adventures away from home, like touring the Galindo house in Concord or shopping at SCRAP. Read more about cozy in our Winter 2017 Issue.

Emerian Rich
Editorial Director

 

 

 

 

SEARCH: Our Food Story

Our Food Story
By Ashley Vrublevskiy

ASHLEYIn my early twenties, I ventured into the world of organic foods and slowly started making healthier choices for myself. I read book after book, loving all the information.

When I became pregnant with Zander, my first son, I vowed to only feed him organic, nutrient dense foods that nourished his body. When he got old enough to start expanding his food options beyond the mashed variety, we realized he was not on board with my food revolution ideas. I became desperate to get him to try new foods. This was the beginning of our long road of food battles. “He won’t even eat cookies! COOKIES!”

I remember saying to a friend to emphasize the severity of my then three-year-old’s eating restrictions. He truly only ate a handful of foods: pretzel sticks, squeezable baby food packs, raisins, and a few fruits, namely raspberries. My only saving grace was he absolutely loved soup. I made the most vegetable filled soups I could think of to be sure he would be getting some key nutrients in his diet. He would gag and refuse anything else. He wouldn’t touch a cookie, pizza, or pasta like most kids his age. I thought he was just picky, and if I kept trying, he would eventually eat more variety.

Around this time…read more in the Fall 2017 issue of SEARCH Magazine.

SEARCH: Chorizo Tamale Pie

Chorizo Tamale Pie
by Brian and Patricia Dake

TAMALE2Fall is a delightful time for entertaining. As sultry summer days give way to blustery afternoons and cooler evenings, we find ourselves heading  indoors for cozy gatherings and comfort foods. This month’s recipe features an entree ideal for dressing up in autumn colors and for autumn holidays.

FILLING

  • Cut ends from onion and cut onion in half. Set aside 1/2. Peel off outside layers of dried onion skin and dice.
  • Cut the top 1/4 inch off the pepper removing the stem. Cut peppers in half length-wise.
  • Set aside 1/2 of each pepper for another use. Cut pepper halves again length-wise, cut out stems and remove the white ribs, membrane and all seeds.
  • Dice peppers.
  • Spray fry pan with cooking spray. …continue reading the Fall issue of SEARCH Magazine.

SEARCH: El Sobrante

El Sobrante
By Emerian Rich

EL SOBRANTE_Rancho El Sobrante used to be the home of the Huichin, an Ohlone Tribe. Spanish missionaries took over the land around 1795, and after Mexico independence from Spain, it was deeded to Juan Jose and Victor Castro. El Sobrante is Spanish for “remaining land” and it’s fitting, given the three odd -shaped pieces of land it covers in-between Pinole, Richmond, and San Pablo.

El Sobrante used to have the reputation of being wild but in recent years has become a more family oriented with many parks in the area. Kennedy Grove, for example, is a great place to have picnics or toss around a football. They also have hiking trails and excellent bird-watching opportunities. For water sports, San Pablo Reservoir offers fishing, boat rentals, kayaking, and canoeing. Water birds abound at the reservoir including white pelicans, geese, ducks, and shorebirds. Along the trails, you can see wild turkey, quail, and dove, as well as predators such as eagles, ospreys, hawks, and owls. You might even spy a deer or a bobcat.

The annual El Sobrante Stroll is an event…continue reading in the Fall issue for 2017.

SEARCH: The Power of Aroma

The Power of Aroma
by Murdo Morrison

MURDOI spent my childhood years during the 1950s in working class neighborhoods in Glasgow, Scotland. In those days any money went to necessities, and special items were things you saved up for.

Luxury items were often out of reach, with much of it yet to be invented. Not only was there less variety, but much of the produce was seasonal. We waited expectantly for the fresh strawberries and rich tarts the baker created. Fresh peaches, one shilling each at the time, were only an occasional treat.

The heightened senses of childhood made for a richer experience. It was a time when many items were served from barrels or bins. Potatoes were scooped onto a heavy scale, cheese was cut from the round. A simple shopping trip would be marked by the distinct aromas of the various stores where the air was filled with a heady mix of Provolone, Salami, spices, and other exotic aromas that, at the time, I was unable to identify. The strongest notes in the ‘perfumed symphony’ were played by the freshly roasted coffee beans. In our world, coffee, when we drank it at all, came from small tins of Nescafé in the form of a powder we mixed with hot water from the kettle. Perhaps it was then the idea… continue reading the Fall issue of SEARCH Magazine.

SEARCH: Abie Ekenezar, Actress

Abie Ekenezar, Actress
by Emerian Rich

abieActress and writer Abie Ekenezar grew up in Clapham, England. She knew she wanted to be an actress in secondary school and although she was nervous in her first play, the acting bug caught her and has not let go.

As a child, she was inspired by William Shakespeare, Tim Curry, David Tennant, Angela Bassett, and Halle Berry. She’s appeared in recent TV Series such as Grimm, Z. Nation, The Librarians, and Twin Peaks.

SEARCH had the pleasure of chatting with her about acting, writing, and what keeps her going.

What is the first creative thing you remember writing?

My poems. I thought I was an actual badass poet.

What books did you enjoy as a child?
RA Salvatore, Drizzt series, Goosebumps, Fear Street from RL Stine and Harlequin, yes I read Harlequin growing up!

What television series were your favorites?
Voltron, ThunderCats, and Are You Afraid of the Dark… continue reading the Fall issue of SEARCH Magazine.

SEARCH: Kenny Cowan, Artist

Kenny Cowan, Artist
by Emerian Rich

KennyCowanKenny Cowan is a Bay Area artist who’s lived in San Francisco for the past twenty-four years. He has been featured in many Bay Area gallery shows and is donating sales of his SF AIDS Memorial Grove prints to the National AIDS Memorial Grove in Golden Gate Park.

The painting featured above is called Land’s End, inspired by a picture taken by his friend Nina Bell. “I seem to constantly ask if I can use a photograph that one of my friends have taken,” Kenny says. “My painting, Golden Gate Bridge, was inspired from a photograph taken by my friend Andrew Smith.”

Although Kenny paints Bay Area Landscapes now, that’s not how he started. Kenny grew up in the small township of Dadeville in Southwest Missouri, population 249. “I had what I consider a wonderful childhood. Can’t say I was ever without anything I needed. I’m from a large family with lots of love.”

The person who most inspired him to create as a child was his art teacher…continue reading the Fall issue of SEARCH Magazine.

Fall 2017, Editor Letter

fallcoverAlthough I love entertaining, I’m not the greatest cook. Not that I can’t cook. I just despise doing it. My family is not the easiest one to cook for either, since we all have different food allergies. For me, recipes need to be simple, quickly assembled, and easily substitutable. My favorite go-to meal when guests show up unexpectedly is chicken salad, which I’ve shared below.

Entertaining is more than just setting out some bags of chips and turning on the TV. It’s a way to show those you care about, how much you care by spending actual time with them. I know, a novel concept in this busy, text-driven world. Putting away the phones and spending time face-to-face is the best gift you can give to those you care about.

In this issue, we’ll be exploring cooking and entertaining in many different ways. For quick and easy entertaining ideas, check out the contributors suggestions throughout this issue. For you cooking pros, we have the Dake’s stunning Chorizo Tamale Pie. Whatever kind of party you’re panning, we’d like to hear your experiences. Read more about entertaining in our Fall 2017 Issue.

Emerian Rich
Editorial Director

Emerian’s Quick Chicken Salad
1 can white meat chicken, shredded
2 heaping tablespoons mayo
1 granny smith apple, diced
Pepper

*Mix chicken, mayo, and diced apples in a bowl.
*Sprinkle pepper over to taste.
*Spread on croissants, wrap in tortilla, or eat with crackers.
If serving in a buffet, you can have extra apple slices or chips to scoop and enjoy.

 

 

SEARCH: Nappy or Not Interview

Nappy or Not
by Emerian Rich

Full Name: Rhonda Glenn
Business Name: Nappy or Not
Business Type: Full Hair Care, Beauty, and Styling.

What makes your hair business different or more special than others? Nappy or Not encourages caring for your natural hair, and we discourage chemicals other than color treatments. Our salon is family orientated as well. We welcome everyone with open arms and encouraging hair care. If your hair isn’t becoming to you, then you should be coming to me.

Any favorite vacation spots in California? Napa Valley wine country, Pismo Beach dunes, San Francisco.

Where did you grow up? I consider myself a nomad because my family and I have lived all across the Gulf and West Coast, but I was born where most of my biological family live, in Houston, TX. However, I attended school in several different areas, causing me to have the ability to adapt very easily to different environments. I attended elementary, middle, and high school in Pomona, CA. I also attended school in Chino, Antelope Valley, Claremont, and graduated in Berkeley. Quite an adventure.

Were your parents supportive in your dreams? My entire family has always been supportive and have worked in the salon as some of my most helpful and dedicated workers… continue reading in Summer issue 2017.