SEARCH: A Bird’s Eye View on Bodega Bay

A Bird’s Eye View on Bodega Bay

by Camellia Rains

About an hour north of San Francisco lies the little coastal town of Bodega Bay, made famous for its portrayal in Alfred Hitchcock’s film, The Birds. As a fan of the film since childhood—it was the first horror film I ever watched and one of the only ones my mother will watch—I decided it would be fun to take her on a short trip to visit the town for what I call “The Birds Tour.”

It’s a small trip, but one well worth taking if you have an interest in the film, the California coast, or just simply enjoy a day trip of driving and exploring a new place.

The drive from San Francisco is scenic, especially in the late winter and early spring months when everything is a particular shade of green that can be seen in the Bay Area and up and down along the coastlines…

Read more in our Summer 2022  #SeaSaltSand issue.

SEARCH: Recycling Glass Jars

As part of our Blast from the Past issue, we’re revisiting useful articles from past issues. This article first appeared in our Summer 2018 issue:

Recycling Glass Jars
by Larriane Barnard

bottlesIf I spent the time, I suppose I could find online, somewhere, useless information on how far the glass jars in the landfills would reach if laid end to end.

I’ve got a pretty good idea glass jars would beat the plastic water bottles shown on some commercials.

Even though many companies are switching to plastic jars, you can give yourself a good idea how many are thrown away by the number of glass ones you pitch in the garbage a week. I know how quickly my jar cabinet filled to overflowing once I started saving them to use instead of plastic containers that melt or stain in the micro or throw away foil, plastic bags, and plastic wrap. I’ve had to shift my going green efforts to include carting my overflow off to the thrift store for repurposing.

Why go to the trouble you ask? A metal lid with a gasket insert makes the jar bug and rodent proof, air and water tight to store liquid, mushy, powdered, or solids. Without a gasket, they’re still… Continue reading the Summer 2020 issue.

SEARCH: Berkeley, California

As part of our Blast from the Past issue, we’re revisiting useful articles from past issues. This article first appeared in our Spring 2018 issue:

Berkeley, California

By Sumiko Saulson

CITY SPOTLIGHT BERKELEYBerkeley is a progressive college town, well known for its commitment to arts, culture, and the ecology. It’s the first US city to create accessible spaces and curbside cutouts for the mobility impaired back in the seventies.

Farmer’s markets, pro-cyclist events like Sunday Streets Berkeley, plentiful bicycle lanes, and automobile-free zones, community gardens, composting, recycling centers, urban farming, and parks dedicated to preserving native wildlife are part of how Berkeley works towards a greener planet.

University of California Berkeley is home to a beautifully manicured thirty-four acre botanical garden featuring foot bridges, relaxing streams, lush flora, and aromatic flowers from around the globe. It’s Student Organic Garden at the corner of Walnut and Virginia Streets, encourages urban farmers to grow healthy, earth-friendly fresh foods… Ccontinue reading in the Summer 2020 issue.

SEARCH: Your New Adventure

As part of our Blast from the Past issue, we’re revisiting useful articles from past issues. This article first appeared in our Summer 2017 issue:

Your New Adventure

by Ashley Vrublevskiy

This is for all the parents just starting out in their journey through an autism or a similar diagnosis for their child. It’s what I wish I would have known before diving in head first into the journey of a lifetime. It’s scary and unknown. There’s no map, but I do know this. You can do it. So, here’s to your new adventure.

There are moments in your life that can immediately change who you are and who you will become. Mine came with that first person who said she was concerned that Zander had autism. Even though it was over four years ago, thinking back on it, I immediately begin to feel the sinking pit grow in my stomach and fill with anxiety. On that day, I honestly felt like I was unable to swallow, choking in a way on the words she spoke.

“Zander shows signs of autism, and I think we should get him evaluated.” My whole body felt instantly heavier as a thousand pounds of worry settled on my chest. I felt so many things in that moment: scared, angry, worried, sad, but oddly, and quite surprisingly to myself, I felt betrayed. I felt betrayed by all the mystical stories of motherhood and the “normal” I would have with my son. It felt like that beautiful dream had been snatched from my grasp by the word “autism” like a selfish thief of joy…. Continue reading in SEARCH Magazine’s Summer 2020 issue.

SEARCH: Half Moon Bay

Half Moon Bay
By Michele Roger

HALF MOON BAYMany travelers book accommodations listed as San Francisco while, in actuality, the hotels are located up to thirty or forty-five minutes outside of the city. Host to over one hundred unique conferences, San Francisco chains host 16.9 million tourists each year.

We all love conferences thanks to networking, motivational lectures, and the general buzz we all get from gathering in one place with like-minded people. They give me the sense that I may be crazy, but I’m not alone.

itting with friends, I had not seen in over a year and drinking coffee was great. Let’s face it, I don’t want to spend my entire weekend eating hotel dining room food. That’s the beauty of Half Moon Bay. With a fifteen minute drive from my hotel, my friends and I were able to escape the scheduled events for a short time, enjoy lunch, … continue reading in the Summer issue for 2018.

SEARCH: Recycling Glass Jars

Recycling Glass Jars
by Larriane Barnard

bottlesIf I spent the time, I suppose I could find online, somewhere, useless information on how far the glass jars in the landfills would reach if laid end to end.

I’ve got a pretty good idea glass jars would beat the plastic water bottles shown on some commercials.

Even though many companies are switching to plastic jars, you can give yourself a good idea how many are thrown away by the number of glass ones you pitch in the garbage a week. I know how quickly my jar cabinet filled to overflowing once I started saving them to use instead of plastic containers that melt or stain in the micro or throw away foil, plastic bags, and plastic wrap. I’ve had to shift my going green efforts to include carting my overflow off to the thrift store for repurposing.

Why go to the trouble you ask? A metal lid with a gasket insert makes the jar bug and rodent proof, air and water tight to store liquid, mushy, powdered, or solids. Without a gasket, they’re still … continue reading the Summer issue of SEARCH Magazine.

SEARCH: Just Keep Swimming

Just Keep Swimming
by Lillian Csernica

AUTISMTo many people, summer means the beach with hot sand, cool water, sunshine, cold drinks, carnival rides, and all that glorious junk food. I remember the day my husband and I took our son, John, to the beach for the first time. John wasn’t even in kindergarten yet, but he already showed a fondness for water.

In early spring, the weather was still cold, the water even colder. John stood there holding his father’s hand, staring out at the Pacific Ocean with his eyes wide. The sight of it blew his mind.

Later, once the weather warmed up, we took John to the beach for the usual fun. That’s when we discovered the sensation of cold means … continue reading the Summer 2018 issue of SEARCH Magazine.

SEARCH: Ambiguous Loss

Ambiguous Loss
by Emerian Rich

AMBIGIOUSLOSSAUTIS,

When you have a baby, your whole world changes. Everyone tells you this will happen when you’re pregnant and it’s one of life’s solid truths along with death and taxes. Still, no matter how you prepare for it, or think you’re ready, it always seems to catch you off guard.

My son was born happy and healthy, if a bit early, twelve years ago. Despite complications during and after pregnancy, we were pretty happy for about a year. We reveled in the new baby smell. We giggled at his baby bandito burrito shape. We even smiled when he pooed. Every parent on the planet can recount these cute stories, whether you want them to or not.

At about a year old we realized we needed to get our son checked out. Even though he was a happy, energy-filled cutie, with the exception of…continue reading the Spring 2018 issue of SEARCH Magazine.

SEARCH: Berkeley, California

Berkeley, California
By Sumiko Saulson

CITY SPOTLIGHT BERKELEYBerkeley is a progressive college town, well known for its commitment to arts, culture, and the ecology. It’s the first US city to create accessible spaces and curbside cutouts for the mobility impaired back in the seventies.

Farmer’s markets, pro-cyclist events like Sunday Streets Berkeley, plentiful bicycle lanes, and automobile-free zones, community gardens, composting, recycling centers, urban farming, and parks dedicated to preserving native wildlife are part of how Berkeley works towards a greener planet.

University of California Berkeley is home to a beautifully manicured thirty-four acre botanical garden featuring foot bridges, relaxing streams, lush flora, and aromatic flowers from around the globe. It’s Student Organic Garden at the corner of Walnut and Virginia Streets, encourages urban farmers to grow healthy, earth-friendly fresh foods…continue reading in the Spring 2018 issue.