SEARCH: When the Big One Hits

When the Big One Hits

by Camellia Rains

Damaged asphalt roadDisaster can hit at any moment and usually when you least expect it. For this reason it is imperative to be prepared and to have supplies and a plan in place.

This was put to the test with my family shortly after 5pm on October 17th, 1989 when a magnitude 6.9 earthquake rocked the bay area, later dubbed the Loma Prieta earthquake.  It was a couple of days before my 13th birthday, and I was focused on the important things in life, while sitting in my backyard, fiercely devouring the latest article on my favorite movie star. All of a sudden, the ground started moving, and it felt like a roller coaster. When it was done, all I could hear was car alarms and my neighbors shouting.

I ran inside and found the house in disarray from things that had fallen off shelves. My parents were okay, and though I didn’t know it at the time, that’s when being prepared pays off.

Until that point, I always questioned … Continue reading in SEARCH Magazine’s Winter 2019 issue.

SEARCH: Food Trucks Are Ready to Serve

Food Trucks Are Ready to Serve

by Lillian Csernica

68615544_459242358264695_2143818554837827584_nWhen disaster strikes, power and water supplies are often damaged. Roads that are washed out by flooding or blocked by debris may prevent the National Guard and the Red Cross from bringing in supplies.

Victims of the disaster and emergency response personnel all require food and water. The newest heroes in disaster relief efforts are the people who own and operate food trucks. From Hurricanes Irma and Harvey and the Las Vegas shooting brought hundreds of food trucks to the front lines of the relief activities without a thought for the costs involved. No one has calculated the financial sacrifice, but scores of individual food trucks set themselves back thousands of dollars, and they’re ready to do it again.

The roots of the food truck concept stretch back to the chuck wagons of the wild west. Serving coffee, beans, dried or smoked meat, and sourdough biscuits, chuckwagons followed the cowboys who were on the trail herding cattle for months at a time… Continue reading in SEARCH Magazine’s Winter 2019 issue.

SEARCH: Preparing for Disasters Both Big and Small

Preparing for Disasters Both Big and Small

by Heather Roulo

Disaster preparedness itemsThe unexpected is all part of life. When disaster strikes, it is best to have already prepared so you can focus on coping with the tough situation.

It isn’t fun to think about disasters, which is one reason FEMA and the CDC briefly reminded people of how to prepare for the zombie apocalypse. If that can’t make you smile, what disaster can? On the West Coast, the more likely threats might include earthquakes, fires, floods, winter storms, and the occasional volcanic eruption. If you’re close to the water, there’s even the rare tsunami. However, it is reassuring to realize that all of these threats are infrequent, and in most cases, do not require emergency action.

For most of us, the next disastrous situation will likely be a household injury, power outage, or a broken-down car. For that reason, at a minimum, you should have BandAids, a first aid kit, flashlight, a rainy-day fund, and a cell phone. With those things, you can handle the quick knocks life sometimes throws our way. If you live in a house, know where your gas and water shutoffs are and the location of your circuit breakers. Check smoke detectors regularly and have a carbon monoxide detector near fuel-burning appliances and fireplaces. Keep a fire extinguisher in the kitchen.

If you have the chance, plan to help others by attending a first aid class and … Continue reading in SEARCH Magazine’s Winter 2019 issue.

SEARCH: I’m Prepared for Anything… Almost

I’m Prepared for Anything…Almost

by Tim Reynolds

SuperPreparedWhen I was a teacher, my classroom was on the second floor of a solid, old limestone school facing west. The two of us, whose classrooms had the best views, were responsible for watching for funnel clouds where the tornadoes came from.

If we sounded out the tornado alarm, the entire school population would march to the basement in a semi-orderly fashion with limited screams and tears and hunker down in the corridor, our heads between our knees or something like that.

We were trained. We were ready until, during a parent/teacher interview, we got hit by an earthquake. It was just a little rumble that made the light fixtures swing back and forth for a minute, but we were not prepared.

Since that day, I have been prepared. I was once an elite Boy Scout, a Chief Scout, which is Canada’s highest honor for Scouts, about the same as an Eagle Scout in the USA. I know how to be prepared.

I have nine computers, prepared for when I fall into a time vortex and wake up in the 1990s needing…

Continue reading in SEARCH Magazine’s Winter 2019 issue.