SEARCH: The Dad Days of Summer

The Dad Days of Summer

by Tim Reynolds

Dad-Me-Banff-80b

We all have summer memories of one sort or another. Mine are pretty good and the best ones involve my father, Ken. Regular readers here know me as the Class Clown of SEARCH Magazine, but what you don’t know is that I inherited my Genetic Goofball gene from my dad.

Although he had a reputation as an ex-military, ex-lumberjack, strongly-disciplined man, Dad was really a big teddy bear with the kind of off-color humor being a navy pilot and a lumberjack will foster. I wish I could share some of his classic chuckles with you here, but SEARCH is a family magazine and Dad…

Read more about Tim Reynold’s The Dad Day of Summer in SEARCH Magazine‘s Summer 2022 #SeaSaltSand issue.

SEARCH: The Heart of the Matter

The Heart of the Matter

by Elliot Thorpe

“Hey, let’s go for a run!”

“Do you mind if I just finish this pack of high-saturated-fat content potato chips first?’ I replied, balancing the TV remote on my knee so I didn’t have to stretch for it. “And my large over-sized tumbler of non-specific branded fizzy pop, filled to the brim with sugars and coloring, will go flat if I don’t drink it all up now.”

Just the thought of both those comestibles gives me a gut ache, let alone the implications of what they could do to my arteries. That said, if I’m honest, the notion of going for a run pretty much fills…

Read the rest in our Winter 2021 #Wellness issue

SEARCH: Robots: Doing What We Can’t in Space

Robots: Doing What We Can’t in Space

by Jim Keller

kellerspaceToday, the farthest humans can go into space is the International Space Station, two hundred and forty miles above the surface of Earth. Humans have never ventured farther than the Moon, roughly 230,000 miles from home.

Today, robotic explorers are crawling on the surface of another planet, chasing asteroids, and even voyaging out beyond the edge of our solar system over, 13 billion miles away. Why are robots doing all the cool, science-fiction stuff?

There are a lot of good reasons to use robots in space instead of humans. First of all, we’re kind of squishy. Robots can be built to withstand the deadly environments in space, anything from extreme heat to extreme cold, vacuum, high-radiation, and more, without getting killed. Robots can also be built with sensors we don’t have, like magnetometers, spectrometers, and the ability to see ultraviolet and infrared light. In short, robots are doing things we can’t.

Even if it’s something we hope humans will do eventually, it’s important to send robots first. NASA landed seven Surveyor robots on the Moon before… Continue reading in the Fall 2019 issue.