SEARCH: Fall 2018 Issue


City Spotlight

Seattle, Washington

Business

Travel Photography

Culture

Ghosts Around the World

Books

Cultural Spotlight Books

Author Spotlight

Elliot Thorpe

Music

Asian Jazz

Travel

Love and Tamales in Mexico

Food

Moroccan Harvest Fusion

Interview

Poetess Kalamu Chaché

Attractions

Queen Mary Ghosts

Fitness

Fitness Around the World

Autism / Parenting

Living in the Light

Humor

Locked Out

Events

Event Pictures

Favorites

What is Your Favorite Bay Area Memory?

Activity

Egyptian Culture

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SEARCH: Summer 2018 Issue

City Spotlight

Colorado Springs, Colorado

#OceanLife

3 Reasons why octopus are the coolest animals in the sea.

Health

The truth about Tourette’s Syndrome.

Books

#OceanLife books.

Author Spotlight

Michele Roger

Music

The Sound of the Sea.

Travel

Bahamas vacation.

Food

Grilled Apricot-Jalapeno Glazed Shrimp

#OceanLife

Olympia National Park

DIY

Recycling Glass Jars

Fitness

Summer Fitness Tips

Autism / Parenting

Just Keep Swimming

Humor

I am Boat People

Events

Event pictures

Attraction

Half Moon Bay

Activity

#OceanLife Scavenger Hunt

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Spring 2018, Editor Letter

I was not always a gardener. I’d lived in dorms, apartments, and rented a house without ever noticing the plants around me. Once I owned my own house, I became excited at the possibilities for the sad, weed-riddled plots circling my yard. I wanted my kids outdoors, riding bicycles and playing tag. A neighbor kindly took me under her wing, perhaps inspired by the view of my yard through her front window, and opened my eyes to the many annuals, perennials, herbs, and evergreens. I found every plant interesting and soon brought home dozens of plants with every kind of foliage and flower.

Since then, my landscaping has calmed down. I’ve learned to arrange the same plants in groupings so they’re more noticeable and easier to maintain, and to appreciate the strength of a good shrub instead of spending money on perennials that flower for a week and do nothing the rest of the year. My gardening fever has calmed, but the joy of seeing new life never ends.

This spring, we welcome you to enter the garden with us. Whether you have a green thumb or prefer to admire plant life from the path, we’ve got you covered. In this issue, you’ll find tips on making things with the herbs you grow and on attracting birds to your garden. Celebrate the refreshing beauty of our local Ruth Bancroft Garden and Philadelphia’s Bartram’s Garden. Get your copy today!

Heather Roulo
Operations Director

 

 

 

SEARCH: Spring 2018 Issue

Get your copy today!

City Spotlight

Berkeley, California

Books

Five Gardening Favorites

Author Spotlight

Tim Reynolds

Tech

Top Five Music Apps

Health

Benefits of Culinary Herbs

Travel

Bartram’s House and Garden

Music

Harp in the Garden

Food

Angel Hair with Garlic, Ricotta, and Fava Beans

Do it Yourself

Brewing Kombucha

Garden

Attracting Birds to Your Garden

Autism / Parenting

Ambiguous Loss

Humor

Trees, Sir

Events

Event pictures

Attraction

Hand Fan Museum

Favorites

Picks from the marketplace

Activity

Garden Bingo

Get your copy today!

SEARCH: Drought-Friendly Gardens

In the Summer Issue of SEARCH Magazine,
we explore Drought-Friendly Gardens
with Suzanne Madron

unnamed (1)When it comes to gardening in dry conditions, many people will abandon hope of having a space that grows more than cacti and rocks. The good news is—unless you love cacti and rocks—your garden doesn’t have to look like a desert. Even better news is you can use some of the plants in the kitchen, but please take careful note of the plant categories, as not all of the plants are edible!

To get started, you will want to check your grow zone. Visit: PlantHardiness.ars.usda.gov

unnamedWhat does it mean? We’ll take a look at San Francisco as an example. San Francisco falls into a 9b-10a hardiness zone, meaning the average annual extreme low temperatures ranged from 25-35 degrees Fahrenheit between 1976-2005. When shopping for outdoor plants, you will want to look for plants that are cold hardy for zone 9b-10a. Other plants that are more cold hardy can also be planted, but be sure to check the care instructions as some plants prefer certain climates, and others can become an invasive species without winter and climate to keep them in check. Most catalogs will list this information in the plant description, and your local garden shops will carry plants specific to your grow zone and conditions…” to read the full article, check out the free eCopy here.

SEARCH: Gardening Apps

In the Spring Issue of SEARCH Magazine,
we have a fun article about Gardening Apps by Dianna Kersey

Wade Fuson - Master Gardener

Wade Fuson – Master Gardener

Back in the 70’s, my grandfather was a part of the organic gardening movement using natural predators and flowers in his gardens. He used science, math, and astronomy for bug control, plant spacing, and sowing the harvest. Back then, I didn’t care about the whats or whys he did the things he did, because my only job was to pick potato bugs, pull weeds, and haul rocks. I didn’t think gardening was that great at the time, but I cherish the memories now. Still, I could have done without the rocks.

My grandfather spent hours researching what kinds of plants were growing in his garden and trying to identify the flower type the bees loved so he could propagate them. He would spend evenings combing through the seed catalogs, and the next season grandma was cooking all kinds of crazy stuff we’d never seen before. That’s when I learned about kohlrabi and how deliciously weird it is…” to read the full article, check out the free eCopy here.