SEARCH: Defying Death to Impress a Girl

In the Summer Issue of SEARCH Magazine,
Defying Death to Impress a Girl
by Tim Reynolds

timI was once a reckless teenage idiot, and to prove it, I’ll tell you, my faithful SEARCH readers, a true story.

Some facts. Her name was Marla, we were both eighteen, and we worked at a suburban summer day camp. I was a non-swimmer, mostly because I was so skinny I sank like a stone and could never pass the tests. I was also a magician—with a crush.

Ironically, one of my jobs at camp was to teach swimming, which was fine, just so long as I stayed out of the deep end. I even had students pass their beginners test before I did.

I performed my magic act for birthday parties or the occasional Bar Mitzvah, and it sometimes involved a Houdini-like escape from small chains locked around my wrists. The chains were real and so was the lock. If trouble happened on dry land, my assistant would use the key to release me from my humiliation. Of course, to impress Marla, I wasn’t going to escape on dry land. Reckless. Idiot…” to read the full article, check out the free eCopy here.

SEARCH: 20 DUMB, IDIOTIC STEPS TO SELF-PUBLISHING WHAT NOT TO DO

In the Spring Issue of SEARCH Magazine,
check out:

20 DUMB, IDIOTIC STEPS TO SELF-PUBLISHING
WHAT NOT TO DO
by Tim Reynolds

“I have self-published four books, and my sales rival Stephen King’s. Okay, maybe they’re not that good, but I’ve sold at least twenty books, if by ‘sold’ I mean ‘gave away to friends and family’. What I’m getting at is, all I know is that I know nothing, and I’m sharing it all with you. Everyone wants to publish a great book, but few do, so let’s get started.

  1. Don’t hire an editor. The average reader reads at a sixth-grade level, and as a writer you write gooder than that. They won’t notice the handful of mistakes on each page. Having a polished, professional publication is highly over-rated, and as expensive as a, well, as an expensive thing.
  2. Don’t do any cover research. Don’t go to any large chain bookstores and take notes on the colors and designs of the best sellers on the same shelves where your book will go. Your cover is a personal statement. Don’t worry about people judging your book…” to read the full article, check out the free eCopy here.

Fall Cake Decorating

Fall Cake Decorating

by Effie Seiberg


cake“I
always loved sculpting, but when I moved from the East Coast to San Francisco and lived in a teeny tiny studio, space mattered. Switching my love of sculpting from clay onto cake was a wonderful discovery. Not only does it save space, but it turns out people are way more excited to get a sculpted cake as a gift than a clay sculpture. Plus, cake is by far the more delicious medium. The nice thing about cake decorating is that it looks much harder than it actually is. Anyone can do it!” to read the full article, download the free eCopy of SEARCH Magazine‘s Fall Issue.

The Great Bad Costume

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The Great Bad Costume

by Tim Reynolds

“I’m sure if we dig deep enough, we all have a best-or-worst costume story somewhere in our memory banks. I love costumes and have won prizes with mine, including a regional theatre award for design, so here is my ‘worst-costume-best-memory’ story.

I was a goofy college senior, and Jane was a beautiful, petite, quietly intelligent freshman. We met at a dance while I was wearing bright orange coveralls and a red felt top hat. That should have been a warning sign that I was a little unconventional, but I suppose Jane was wide-eyed attracted to the fact I had just been cast as a Shark in the college’s fall production of West Side Story, the reason I was tearing up the dance floor in all my sartorial splendor.

That was late September. We only lived a block apart on the same part of campus so we got to see each other at the occasional meal in the Refectory and in the Great Hall common room when my rehearsals and lackadaisical studies didn’t conflict with her intensely serious studies. It was a time of innocence for both of us, unlike ‘kids these days’. What time we spent together was mostly hand-holding walks on campus and how-was-your-day chats. There was no Internet and no cellphones, no emails, and no texts. Neither of us even had a phone in our residence room, requiring a visit to the Proctor’s Desk or a payphone to reach anyone not close enough to yell at down the hall...” to read the full article, download the free eCopy of SEARCH Magazine‘s Fall Issue.