SEARCH: Berkeley, California

Berkeley, California
By Sumiko Saulson

CITY SPOTLIGHT BERKELEYBerkeley is a progressive college town, well known for its commitment to arts, culture, and the ecology. It’s the first US city to create accessible spaces and curbside cutouts for the mobility impaired back in the seventies.

Farmer’s markets, pro-cyclist events like Sunday Streets Berkeley, plentiful bicycle lanes, and automobile-free zones, community gardens, composting, recycling centers, urban farming, and parks dedicated to preserving native wildlife are part of how Berkeley works towards a greener planet.

University of California Berkeley is home to a beautifully manicured thirty-four acre botanical garden featuring foot bridges, relaxing streams, lush flora, and aromatic flowers from around the globe. It’s Student Organic Garden at the corner of Walnut and Virginia Streets, encourages urban farmers to grow healthy, earth-friendly fresh foods…continue reading in the Spring 2018 issue.

Advertisements

SEARCH: SCRAP, San Francisco

SCRAP, San Francisco
By Emerian Rich

SCRAPSFSCRAP is an awesome place for crafters, teachers, and makers. Essentially an art and crafts thrift store, this nonprofit is a great place to both donate and shop.

Calling themselves “a source for the resourceful”, SCRAP is a creative re-use center, material depot, and workshop space founded in 1973. Breathing new life into old objects, SCRAP reduces waste by diverting over 200 tons of materials heading to landfill every year. For those looking for a learning opportunity, SCRAP offers classes and workshops. Some are regular drop-in events, while others require registration beforehand.

Located at 801 Toland Street, San Francisco, this is a creators dream. Supplies are inexpensive and range from fabric and home decorating items to paper, craft supplies, crayons, and books. Educators will love…continue reading in the Winter issue for 2017.

SEARCH: Rodeo, California

Rodeo, California
By Leslie Light

RodeoRodeo, California was not my first choice to live in. It’s a small town on the north-western edge of the San Francisco Bay Area. It isn’t tony, or upscale, or even hipster. What it is, however, is easy. Easy to get to and out of. Easy to stay in and make a quiet home. We’ve been here five years and will probably stay five more.

Rodeo is bisected by the I-80 freeway. The built up part of town can be divided into three areas: Old, Mid-Century, and New. Most of the Rodeo town limits is open space where cows graze, and there is rumored to be an old military installation somewhere. Regardless of where you are, you can see a field of grass.

In the “old” part of town are cute three and four bedroom houses built before WWII. Sitting porches with views of rose bushes are the primary look and feel. Many have back decks have a view of San Pablo Bay. Most of the Mid-Century houses were built for…continue reading in the Winter issue for 2017.

SEARCH: Galindo House, Concord

Galindo House, Concord
By Emerian Rich

Galindo.jpgMost Concord residents never knew the Galindo house existed until a few years ago when the Concord Historical Society took charge of the estate and cleaned up the trees and greenery in front of it.

Located at 1721 Amador Avenue, Galindo House was built in 1856 for one of Concord’s founders, Don Francisco Galindo and his wife Maria Dolores Manuella Pacheco. The six-room farmhouse sat on the then seventeen-thousand acres of land granted to Galindo after the Mesoamerican War. The names Galindo and Pacheco will sound familiar to residents because many of our streets and buildings are named after the founding fathers. Don Salvio Pacheo’s Adobe at 1870 Abode Street—belonging to Maria’s father—is another notable building still standing from that time period, but Galindo House was the first wooden house built in town. …continue reading in the Winter issue for 2017.

SEARCH: New Zealand

New Zealand
by Michele Roger

Michele-Roger-New-ZealandNew Zealand, known by the native Maori people as “The Land of the Long White Cloud” is a place of astounding beauty and strength, much like those who live there.

Famous for its booming dairy and lamb industry as well its legendary “All Blacks” rugby team, New Zealand is far more than the face it shows to the world. The place is still fearless, proud, and some of the friendliest souls you will ever meet. To share a pint of beer is to make a friend for life. Travelers like myself are forever changed for the better after spending time there.

Broken up into two islands, the south has been made famous by the Lord of the Rings movies. All that cinematography wasn’t a green screen. It’s that breathtaking and untouched. Since so much focus has been on the south, I’ve decided to write about the splendor the north island has to offer. For direct flights from the United States to New Zealand, you’llread more in the Fall 2017 issue of SEARCH Magazine.

SEARCH: Our Food Story

Our Food Story
By Ashley Vrublevskiy

ASHLEYIn my early twenties, I ventured into the world of organic foods and slowly started making healthier choices for myself. I read book after book, loving all the information.

When I became pregnant with Zander, my first son, I vowed to only feed him organic, nutrient dense foods that nourished his body. When he got old enough to start expanding his food options beyond the mashed variety, we realized he was not on board with my food revolution ideas. I became desperate to get him to try new foods. This was the beginning of our long road of food battles. “He won’t even eat cookies! COOKIES!”

I remember saying to a friend to emphasize the severity of my then three-year-old’s eating restrictions. He truly only ate a handful of foods: pretzel sticks, squeezable baby food packs, raisins, and a few fruits, namely raspberries. My only saving grace was he absolutely loved soup. I made the most vegetable filled soups I could think of to be sure he would be getting some key nutrients in his diet. He would gag and refuse anything else. He wouldn’t touch a cookie, pizza, or pasta like most kids his age. I thought he was just picky, and if I kept trying, he would eventually eat more variety.

Around this time…read more in the Fall 2017 issue of SEARCH Magazine.

SEARCH: El Sobrante

El Sobrante
By Emerian Rich

EL SOBRANTE_Rancho El Sobrante used to be the home of the Huichin, an Ohlone Tribe. Spanish missionaries took over the land around 1795, and after Mexico independence from Spain, it was deeded to Juan Jose and Victor Castro. El Sobrante is Spanish for “remaining land” and it’s fitting, given the three odd -shaped pieces of land it covers in-between Pinole, Richmond, and San Pablo.

El Sobrante used to have the reputation of being wild but in recent years has become a more family oriented with many parks in the area. Kennedy Grove, for example, is a great place to have picnics or toss around a football. They also have hiking trails and excellent bird-watching opportunities. For water sports, San Pablo Reservoir offers fishing, boat rentals, kayaking, and canoeing. Water birds abound at the reservoir including white pelicans, geese, ducks, and shorebirds. Along the trails, you can see wild turkey, quail, and dove, as well as predators such as eagles, ospreys, hawks, and owls. You might even spy a deer or a bobcat.

The annual El Sobrante Stroll is an event…continue reading in the Fall issue for 2017.

SEARCH: Nappy or Not Interview

Nappy or Not
by Emerian Rich

Full Name: Rhonda Glenn
Business Name: Nappy or Not
Business Type: Full Hair Care, Beauty, and Styling.

What makes your hair business different or more special than others? Nappy or Not encourages caring for your natural hair, and we discourage chemicals other than color treatments. Our salon is family orientated as well. We welcome everyone with open arms and encouraging hair care. If your hair isn’t becoming to you, then you should be coming to me.

Any favorite vacation spots in California? Napa Valley wine country, Pismo Beach dunes, San Francisco.

Where did you grow up? I consider myself a nomad because my family and I have lived all across the Gulf and West Coast, but I was born where most of my biological family live, in Houston, TX. However, I attended school in several different areas, causing me to have the ability to adapt very easily to different environments. I attended elementary, middle, and high school in Pomona, CA. I also attended school in Chino, Antelope Valley, Claremont, and graduated in Berkeley. Quite an adventure.

Were your parents supportive in your dreams? My entire family has always been supportive and have worked in the salon as some of my most helpful and dedicated workers… continue reading in Summer issue 2017.

SEARCH: BAY AREA, Maritime Museums

BAY AREA, Maritime Museums
By Sumiko Saulson

As a world-renowned seaport, the San Francisco Bay Area is home to several maritime museums. The San Francisco Maritime National Historical Park is home to two maritime history museums: the J. Porter Shaw Library of Maritime History and the Maritime Museum across from Ghirardelli Square.

Aquatic Park Cove, is an encased area with swimming between Hyde Street Pier and Aquatic Park Pier. There are several historical vessels one can visit along Hyde Street Pier. The oldest, the 1886 squarerigger Balclutha, looks like a pirate ship Vallejo’s Mare Island Strait is home to a haunting series of partially deconstructed naval vessels called the Razorblade Fleet. The Mare Island Museum gives a glimpse into the island’s history with tours of maritime vessels and officer’s quarters. The Vallejo Naval and Historical Museum showcases the city’s long history as a naval port. …continue reading in the Summer issue for 2017.

SEARCH: City Spotlight on Concord

Concord, CA
by Emerian Rich

Picture of ConcordConcord is the largest city in Contra Costa County. Founded in 1869 by Salvio Pacheco as Todo Santos, the name was changed within months to Concord. Now, the city center park, Todos Santos Plaza, is a reminder of that first name. With multiple stops on the BART system to connect it with San Francisco, Berkeley, and Oakland, Concord has expanded past its bedroom community status. New condos and neighborhood renovation has made this community bigger in the past few years as lack of housing has pushed the city to think of new innovative ways to build.

Residents enjoy a wide array of entertainment packed in to the thirty miles of town. The Concord Pavilion on one side of town brings in headliners and festivals. On the other side Solano Drive-in—one of the last surviving Bay Area drive-in theaters—hosts not only movies, but a year-round public swap meet Saturdays and Sundays.

In the center of town, Todos Santos Plaza hosts a weekly farmer’s market with a wide array of fruits and vegetables at reasonable rates. A handful of hot food vendors, including my favorite teriyaki-on-a-stick booth, offer ready-made goods to enjoy… Read more in the Summer issue of SEARCH Magazine.